“I’m glad to be leaving the game which had grown quite chaotic” (Alice)

  1. When striking a ball the striker may NOT:
    1. touch the head of the mallet with his hand, or slide the mallet along his foot or leg to guide it; touch the head of the mallet with his hand;
    2. rest the shaft of the mallet or a hand or arm on the ground or an outside agency;
    3. rest the shaft of the mallet or a hand or arm directly connected with the stroke against any part of his legs or feet;
    4. move the striker’s ball other than by striking it with the mallet audibly and distinctly;
    5. causes or attempts to cause the mallet to strike the striker’s ball by kicking, hitting, dropping or throwing the mallet;
    6. strike the striker’s ball with any part of the mallet other than an end face of the head, either:
      1. deliberately; or
      2. accidentally in a stroke which requires special care because of the proximity of a hoop or the peg or another ball;
    7. subject to Law 28(d), maintain contact between the mallet and the striker’s ball for an appreciable period when the striker’s ball is not in contact with any other ball or after the striker’s ball has hit another ball;allow the mallet to be in contact with the striker’s ball after the striker’s ball has hit another ball; subject to Law 28(d), strike the striker’s ball more than once in the same stroke or allow the striker’s ball to retouch the malletstrike the striker’s ball so as to cause it to touch a hoop upright or, unless the striker’s ball is pegged out in the stroke, the peg when in contact with the mallet;
      1. in a croquet stroke, or continuation stroke when the striker’s ball is touching another ball, allow the mallet to contact the striker’s ball visibly more than once; or
      2. in any other stroke, allow the mallet to contact the striker’s ball more than once; or
      3. in any stroke, allow the mallet to remain in contact with the striker’s ball for an observable period;
    8. strike the striker’s ball when it lies in contact with a hoop upright or, unless the striker’s ball is pegged out in the stroke, the peg other than in a direction away therefrom;
    9. move or shake a ball at rest by hitting a hoop or the peg with the mallet or with any part of his body or clothes;
    10. touch any ball, other than the striker’s ball, with the mallet;
    11. touch any ball with any part of his body or clothes;
    12. in a croquet stroke, play away from or fail to move or shake the croqueted ball;
    13. damage the court with the mallet, to the extent that a subsequent stroke played over the damaged area could be significantly affected, in a stroke in which either:
      1. his swing is restricted by a hoop, or the peg, or a ball not in contact with the striker’s ball; or
      2. he is attempting to make the striker’s ball jump; or
      3. the striker’s ball is part of a group.
        The penalty for all of these is that the turn ends, it is the opponent’s option as to whether the balls are replaced or remain where they lie. In the event of a croqueted ball leaving the lawn and a fault being claimed, the adversary may waive the fault and the balls remain where they end up and the turn finishes.
        http://www.oxfordcroquet.com